How to identify archetypes and structure in art

Here is a shortcut method to identifying the five layers of subconscious archetypal structure in artworks or building sites: Identify a likely periphery of figures in a roughly elliptical arrangement; List the figures in their circular sequence, by any distinctive attribute, such as a posture, season, function, species, or device; Provisionally tag the list or the artwork, with likely type numbers, such as 10 Teacher  for a figure with arms up or a staff, 12 or 13 Heart for a felid, 1 or 2 Builder for a bovid or tower, 5 Priest for varicoloured, skin paint or a hyperactive posture; Tag figures notably ingressed or egressed towards or away from the centre, as 6 Exile or 14 Mixer; Tag a pregnant figure as 11 Womb; and an adjacent major figure as 12 or 13 Heart (usually with an exposed chest), and the adjacent figure on the other side as 10 Teacher; Complete the axial grid; Use the set of typology labels below.

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Mindprint on the Narmer palette front

The Narmer palette front demonstrates subconscious expression of archetypal structure in a decanal set, in stock Sumerian and Egyptian pre-dynastic style. Here is the standard list of the types, with the characters in this artwork, in seasonal sequence from the former spring point, with its analogous hour decan.

Mindprint and decans in the Dendera zodiac

In the Dendera zoidac, the sixteen typology axes are subconsciously curved into a vortex, to link the eyes of northern, ecliptic and southern decans, to galactic or determinant characters in the border. Zodiacs usually do not express the archetypal sequence, nor the axial ocular (eye to eye) structure. This vortex indicates inspired structuralist detail, beyond the needs of astrology or astronomy. Here is another timeless record of our collective need for subconscious structuralist calibration, enabling the collective therapy of expressing who, what, where, when and how we fit into nature, and ultimately into archetype.