Categories
Structural art analysis using mindprint

Stoneprint reveals archetypal structure on building sites

Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities (Edmond Furter, 2016, Four Equators Media, 400 pages, 170mm x 295mm, 130 illustrations) resolves the main source of correspondences between ancient cultures. Stoneprint reveals archetypal structure on building sites.
We have an innate subconscious compulsion to express a specific, complex, archetypal set of features, in sequence, and on an axial grid, in all our works.
The book demonstrates the innate universal structure in our works, including art, rock art, houses, kivas, temples, villages, sacred sites, monuments, pyramids (Egyptian, Chinese, Olmec as well as Mayan pyramid fields), and cities.
The examples range from the Ice Age thaw at Gobekli Tepe, Malta, and Scotland; to prehistoric sites such as Babylon; semi-historic sites such as the Giza, Avebury and Stonehenge landscapes; historic sites such as Ephesus, Rome, Axum, Quebec, and Cape Town; and across all continents and cultures, including Africa, the far east, south America (including Nazca) and North America (including Mystery Hill).
Among the cultural media that carry the human code, and camouflage it from our conscious mind until revealed by structural analysis; are rock art, ‘fine’ art, ritual, myth, poetry (such as two examples of Babylonian building rites, and two poems by William Blake) buildings, sites and region (such as Babylonia).
Nature also express archetypal structure. Stoneprint reveals several direct links between subconscious cultural expressions, and the periodic table (when charted on a spiral as by Maurice Peyroux); chemical elements; reflexology charts of our palms, irises, teeth, earlobes and inner ears. Our eye-hand-mind co-ordination expresses the same universal structure in building sites, even by different architects, and different generations of rulers and builders.
Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities, now enables conscious access to our subconscious behaviour, which is revealed as standarised, rigorous, universal, eternal, complex, yet measurable.

Stoneprint (2016) back cover, spine, and front cover.

The book places the discovery of subconscious behaviour (first reported by the author, Edmond Furter, in Mindprint in 2014), in the context of the esoteric crafts of alchemy, kabbalah, cosmology, astrology, and art; as well as the context of each human science: art history, archaeology, anthropology (with a humorous detour into popular archaeology), psychology, and sociology.
The implications of the discovery of the universal stoneprint structure for popular culture (including various schools of popular archaeo astronomy) , and for the human sciences, are significant.
Order the book Stoneprint, in Europe at E30 plus postage, from Four Equators Media via [edmond at syrex dot co dot za], payment on Paypal.
Order the book Stoneprint in the USA at $30 plus postage, from Four Equators Media via [edmond at syrex dot co dot za], payment on Paypal.
Order the book Stoneprint in South Africa at R300 (including free postage to any Postnet account in South Africa; or plus R30 postage; or plus R60 per courier), from Four Equators Media via 011 955 6732 or [edmond at syrex dot co dot za], payment on Paypal.
The index indicates the broad scope and depth of 28 years of research reported in Stoneprint. Each relevant craft and science is placed in context. Natural expressions are compared to cultural expressions. Each building site is illustrated by a map, and at least two pages of detailed structural analysis.

Introduction
2 Architecture reveals our subconscious building code
3 The Five levels of structure in cultural media
3 The sixteen archetypes, in sequence
4 The axial grid of focal points
6 The four borderline types
7 The two galactic gates or cross-points
7 The polar clock of Ages
8 The six polar points
9 Structural analysis example of a site sketch plan

The cultural context of the human code
11 Alchemy: Crafts reveal chemistry
13 Chemistry reveals biology
15 Kabalah: Natural philosophy correspondences
17 Poetry: Blake’s London- Jerusalem- Golgonooza
21 Poetry: Blake’s Tyger describes expression
22 Poetry: The Stoneprint rhyme
24 Astrology: Calendars reveal divination
27 Cosmology: Direction is everywhere

The scientific context of the human code
31 Art History: Perception reveals gestalt
37 Archaeology: The World Archives challenge
42 Anthropology: Artefacts reveal structure
47 Popular Anthropology: Who did it?
52 Psychology: Behaviour reveals archetype
57 Philosophy: The universe reveals archetype
60 Communication Science: Structure is the message
63 Sociology: Behaviour reveals our self-image
66 Science and esoterica: our split consciousness
70 Why I wrote Stoneprint

73 [Chapter A] Natural elementary maps
74 The periodic table reveals atomic structure
80 Nuclear particles reveal atomic polar structure
81 Compounds confirm the axial pairs
82 Constellations chart our cosmos and myth
84 Astronomical poles in our cosmos
86 A crop circle solar system implies two grids
92 Earth imprints a motto: ‘I oppose artifice’
94 Trails of architecture in two crop circles
95 Numbers have character
96 Mars ‘face’ geology invites human gestalt

99 [Chapter B] Natural body maps

100 Our hands carry the imprint
102 Our eyes are windows to the body and structure
104 Our minds carry the imprint
106 Dental reflexology: the ‘boneprint’ in our cave
111 Our outer ear lobe reflex map
112 Our inner ear reflex map
113 Eye, palm, teeth, ear and organ map
114 Limb joints mark six poles

115 [Chapter C] Natural culture maps
116 Piacenza bronze liver double circle of gods
120 The sixth layer of culture is style conformity
121 Three sets of Etruscan gods integrated
121 Planets express poles and gates, not types
122 Gods or liver maps, which came first?
123 Piacenza city and its walls are cultural stoneprints

125 [Chapter D] Culture maps
126 The Maikop silver bowl paradise
128 Paradise, Fall, and Babel in a nutshell
129 Mapungubwe’s gold foil oracle reconstructed
130 A Venda divination bowl
132 An Italian Goose game board
134 Pedra Pintada engraving oval, and pentagons
138 The Bulgarian Karanovo tablet answers questions

139 [Chapter E] Ice Age sites

140 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe house C, polar boars
147 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe house D, type 14
150 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe house B, type 2
152 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe house A, type 3
154 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe excavation and radar maps
156 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe pillar D43, a culture portrait
158 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe grey pillar
159 Babylonia: Inana huts, Nevali Cori kiva, Kurdish huts
160 Turkey: Gobekli Tepe site perspective
161 China: An Iron Age T-shaped silk drape
162 A Greek healing pillar, and Shinto dressed pillars
163 Spain: Malta’s Mnajdra double stoneprint
164 Spain: Malta’s Gigantija double stoneprint
167 Spain: Hal Saflieni’s underground stoneprint
168 Scotland: Skara Brae plans
169 Scotland: Jarlshof wheelhouses and recycling
170 Spain: A Menorcan taula reconstruction puzzle

171 [Chapter F] Early civil sites in Sumeria
172 Babylonia was a stoneprint in clay brick
174 Babylon city, a vortex of dispersion
176 Two mythical gates
177 King-priest Ur Nanshe builds a temple
178 He built sixteen shrines
179 His crafts reveal subconscious method
180 He casts the circle of eternity, or polar ring
181 He was a visionary like Solomon
182 He works magic: as below, so above
184 He was an inspired architect, like Hiram of Tyre
185 He did not understand the building plan
188 He taxed the clans for construction
190 His allies and contractors
191 He surveys eight rooms, and erects eight doors
193 He set up six slabs as poles
194 An, Enlil, Enki: three equators to survey the site
195 Assyria: T-pillars and Y-tents in an army camp
296 Egypt: Narmer’s camp, and a school camp

197 [Chapter G] Early civil sites in Egypt
298 Sakkara, first royal campus, and a stepped pyramid
200 Teti’s pyramids form a stoneprint in Sakkara
201 Giza pyramid field stoneprint
204 Giza pyramid field is also a polar map
206 Kings Valley tombs are underground stoneprints
212 Queens Valley entrances lost and found
214 A ‘Syrian’ queen in a womb among wombs
216 Edfu temple is a double churn
218 Senmut’s ceiling stoneprint is half zodiac, half duat
220 Duats and decans are arch mutators

221 [Chapter H] Civil outpost sites
222 Nubia: Meroe pyramids speak with their doors
224 Egypt: Nabta Playa slab field counts four Ages
226 Egypt: Hawara labyrinth in Kircher’s Gnostic vision
228 Nubia: The cornucopia of minister Huy
230 Palestine: Jerusalem temple mount hybrid
233 Patriarchs, pharaohs, and kings
234 Palestine: Jerusalem, womb of three religions
236 Judea: Masada, a military stoneprint
238 Turkey: Nemrut hill, crossroad of Persians and Greeks
242 Australia: Elivna rock pavement engraving
244 Ethiopia: Axum is an ark of spiritual mysteries
247 Ethiopia: Lalibela temple field of bedrock ‘hearts’
249 Ethiopia: Lalibela’s Mary church; womb in a womb
250 Ethiopia: A reverse rock imprint spells ‘Rotas’

251 [Chapter J] Prehistoric European sites
252 Ireland: Drombeg house, a cosy double stoneprint
254 England: Avebury and Silbury landscape
256 England: Stonehenge counted three ages
263 England: Damerham circles in radar scan
264 England: Stonehenge landscape radar scan
266 England: Stanton Moor landscape; boulders and ‘ladies’
268 Greece: Phaistos palace, the other Greek labyrinth
270 Germany: Magdalenburg mound graves
273 Scotland: Stennes stone circle
274 Scotland: Cochno stone concentric engravings

275 [Chapter K] African sites
276 Zimbabwe: Great Zimbabwe, landscape with a womb
278 Zimbabwe: Great Zimbabwe queen’s yard with a womb
280 A kudurru boundary stone calendar spring bird
281 Egypt: Dendera zodiac summer bird
282 Zimbabwe: Nhunguza and Penhalonga metallurgy floors
283 South Africa: San Bushman painted stoneprints on rock
284 Mali: Nature and culture on a Dogon mud wall
286 South Africa: Lydenburg concentric engravings boulder

287 [Chapter L] Eastern sites
288 India: Buddhist wheel of life landscape panorama
289 India: Sanchi temple gate pagoda engraving
292 Nepal: Kathmandu palace square temple complex
294 China: Beijing Temple of Heaven park, an Aquarian cosmos
295 China: Choukungmu pyramid fields need more research
296 Japan: Nara Basin Horyuji temple, galactic manifestation
297 Japan: Todai temple, a living site
298 Japan: Himeji, Shirasagi-jo temple, White Heron nests

299 [Chapter M] Mexican sites
300 Izapa pyramid field and stelae, new world, same stoneprint
302 Izapa cacao tree ritual stele, a third layer of structure
304 La Venta pyramid field, spire eyes, platform womb
306 Monte Alban double stoneprint works with the landscape
309 Coba, a triple Stoneprint with interlocking ‘galaxy’
310 Uxmal was contested by a witch, a dwarf, and a king
312 Chichen Itza has temples to planets, and a stoneprint
314 Chichen Itza village scene, a busy day
315 Teotihuacan mountain stream, and rain woman mural
316 Teotihuacan pyramid avenue, Leo sun, Virgo moon
318 El Tajin pyramid field, double thunder
320 Palenque lid cosmic tree and double stoneprint
322 Palenque pyramid field, chaos among order

323 [Chapter N] North and South American sites
324 Peru: Machu Picchu, Mayan capital in the clouds
326 Bolivia: Tiahuanaco island’s Sun Gate is the sun type
328 Chile: Atacama geoglyphs with Aquarian tailcoats
330 Peru: Nazca plain geoglyphs express ecological structure
332 Peru: Cuzco’s Coricancha constellations reveal an update
335 USA: California’s Painted Rock, theatre of time
340 USA: Lower Colorado River geoglyphs has a calendar clock
342 USA: Hopi kiva 5mT2, and its village, hinge on a womb
344 USA: Colorado’s Mystery Hill metallurgy plant or tech school
346 USA: Crow Canyon kivas Block 100 has two missing features

347 [Chapter P] Historic Western sites
348 Italy: Rome, eternal city with an Age update
350 Italy: Rome’s gates and bridges are eloquent
352 Italy: Rome’s Capitol Forum, contested but constant
354 Italy: Rome’s Quirinal forums for spiritual order
356 Italy: Rome’s Vatican City, a stoneprint inside type Aries
360 Italy: Brescia has Mark’s lion, Mary’s womb, John’s bull
362 Turkey: Ephesus, former city of Amazons and Artemis
363 Icons: Serapis and Ophiotaurus, half-monsters
366 Spain: Santiago de Compostella, of a son of thunder
367 Spain: St James and Hercules, hybrid planetary characters
370 Canary Islands: Las Palmas governor’s house facade
372 Canada: Quebec, Victorian ideals in stone
374 South Africa: Cape Town’s Dutch forts claimed a footprint

376 [Chapter Q] Structural analysis formats
376 Kinds of media in the 130 examples
376 Commission impossible: design a stoneprint site
377 Emblems, icons, constellations and Tarot trumps

382 [Appendices]
382 How to find the subconscious structure on a site plan
382 The structural analysis format
384 About the author
385 Sources and references

Categories
Mindprint the subconscious art code

Introduction to Mindprint, the subconscious art code

In artefacts and artworks, where archaeo astronomers see ancient star maps, archaeologists see cultural traditions, and anthropologists see initiation secrets, appear a standard axial grid of archetypes, always in the same sequence.

[UPDATE 2016: Mindprint demonstrated our individual expression of archetype in art. The book laid the foundation for revealing our innate, subconscious, collective expression of archetypal structure, in buildings, villages, temples complexes, pyramid fields, geoglyphs and cities. Our collective subconscious is revealed in Stoneprint, with 400 pages and 130 illustrations, placing subconscious behaviour in the context of five sciences and several cultural crafts. Visit www.stoneprint.wordpress.com for extracts from this important new book.]

The subconscious art code or human imprint also appears in our eye, hand and body reflexology points, and in cosmology. Constellations are only myth maps, but myth, and therefore constellations, also bear the imprint of the structure of our perception.

All inspired artists, in the Stone, Ice, Bronze and Iron Ages; Babylonians, Egyptians, Chinese, Celts, Mayans, Vikings and moderns, subconsciously express mindprint, our eternal artefact.

The core content of art, myth and culture around the world is identical. Beneath thin layers of flamboyant styling and learning lies a surprisingly standard structure, beyond the conscious control of artists, mystery schools or secret societies.

All inspired artworks containing more than ten figures express a standard, involuntary sequence of types. Artists are not aware that their eye -hand -mind co-ordination expresses a universal structure.

Each figure type is characterised by one or two of its optional attributes and by its relative position. The types are spaced as paired opposites around an irregular ellipse, and precisely anchored to a standard axial structure, hinged on a geometric centre with tri-polar elements.

The structure emerging in the 200 illustrations and in the statistical analysis, is a visual grammar or art code, never before described in art history, archaeology, psychology, esoterica or popular crafts. The book is written as popular archaeology, but it has several implications for academic research.

Archetypes could be labelled in mythical, seasonal or astrological terms, yet none of these sets are origins of archetype. All are equally partial and imperfect expressions of pre-existent, universal structure.

The underlying structure of nature, culture and perception is largely subconscious, not fully verbalised by artists or viewers. Now these subconscious meanings are rendered partially conscious, and accessible by identifying relevant features, and thus types, and by using a list of the average frequencies of occurrences of the features of typology, and using the axial grid structure.

The axial geometric structure in the positioning of the eyes of the sequence of figures is made visible by drawing a set of lines that always cross in one point. This structure is visually disguised by some radial distortion (a sunburst shape); variety of subject and style; and two standard deviations, to a heart as a kind of spiritual eye, and to a womb as a kind of unborn eye.

Visual expression arises from nature, reflexology, and the collective subconscious. Learning, borrowing and idiosyncratic features do not affect the options, nor their average frequencies. The structure of perception and expression, or archetype, is inherent in all forms of figurative arts and crafts, including engravings, murals, frescoes, spiritual, religious, political and portable artefacts, professional and amateur art; and building sites (see http://www.stoneprintjournal.blog). Mindprint in ‘story’ paintings on buffalo skin are among the many indications that archetypal structure also enables myth, legend, perception, and to some extent, events.

The ‘readable’ elements in visual expression reveal a similar structure in myth, literature, cosmology, calendric cycles and nature, confirming the role of what philosophy and psychology describe as archetype.

Myth likewise uses characters differentiated by stock attributes, actions, motivations and episodes, and also expresses natural, social and cultural structure.

Art is less constrained by conscious cognitive processes than myth, which is bound by verbal, acoustic and dramatic grammar. Visual art is more direct, more impulsive, more compulsive to artists and viewers, more layered, and closer to inspiration.

The subconscious imprint, referred to as mindprint, tupos (imprint), art code, human subtext, Furter grid or archetypal art code, is predictive and testable. Practical proof of the persistence and prevalence of mindprint in art is illustrated in 200 of the 400 artworks and rock art works listed in the Index (some of the further 600 demonstrations are posted on this site, and the three related sites).

Major, testable, conceptual, as well as minor attributes of types, each with their average occurrences, invariably marked by the standard axial grid, are listed in Mindprint (2014, Lulu.com), in the Introduction and in the Statistical test chapter.

Type 5 Priest or Aquarius, for example, is varicoloured (44%), horizontal (30%), in active posture (31%), and among the four large chracters (24%) on average in all artworks [the list of known features, and known average frequencies, was extended by new discoveries in Stoneprint, and in editions of Stoneprint Journal, in 2018, and 2019; see extracts on http://www.stoneprintjournal.wordpress.com].

Type 10 Teacher or Libra has an arm or arms in V- or W-shape (53%) and holds a staff (34%) on average in all artworks.

Based on overwhelming statistical and geometric evidence of the collective, universal, subconscious sequence of optional attributes in inspired art, and of the conceptual relationships between the optional elements of each type, the tables of myths, icons, constellations and concepts in this study are proven.

They describe the standard structure of visual expression, as an involuntary art code arising from subconscious inspiration.

Additional variant expressions of each type are also considered, for example type 15 Maker or Gemini as a rope (33%) and/or bag (21%), and/or creator (such as Ptah), and/or smiting (16%), and/or doubled as in the concept of Gemini (8%) [however twins is a feature of type 4 King or Pisces], and/or canine, and/or with a hip wound, and/or in a boat shrine (of minor percentages). Identification of types rises above 90% if these variants (discussed in the Attributes section, Tables and captions) are considered together.

(Excerpt from the Introduction to Mindprint, the subconscious art code, by Edmond Furter, 2014, Lulu.com, 266 pages; 100 pages of context and explanation, 200 illustrations. The book is on mail order from Lulu in the USA at $29 plus $8 postage ($37, about R370), and at presentations in South Africa at R250. Order directly from Lulu, not from other websites that may add their costs to the price.

Categories
Mindprint the subconscious art code

What is mindprint, the subconscious art code

An Australian Kimberley Gwion 'Sashes' area rock art image (Bradshaw Foundation) of dancers, one with a long-necked mask, with mindprint labels and axes by Edmond Furter.
An Australian Kimberley Gwion ‘Sashes’ area rock art image (Bradshaw Foundation) of dancers, one with a long-necked mask, with typology labels and axial grid by Edmond Furter.
Mindprint or stoneprint model of character types, in their peripheral sequence, as pairs of opposites forming an axial grid of eyes, with five polar points of limb joints or junctures.

Mindprint is sixteen recurrent character types, each expressing a cluster of optional archetypal features, and each feature at a specific fixed frequency globally; with the eyes or focal points of pairs of opposite forming an axial grid; surrounding five polar points of limb joints or junctures in specific sectors.

The eyes or focal points of typological characters are replaced by a heart and a womb, in adjacent positions; at type 12 and/or 13 Heart, and type 11 Womb. Characters form an irregular and ragged oval, at varied radii. The spatial structure is analogous to a flattened cosmic sphere of three planes (ecliptic, galactic and celestial), with polar features of the underside or ‘south’ visible as limb joints in certain positions.

One or both the ‘celestial’ poles is incidental with the position of the midsummer and midwinter solstices, as it was in one of the last three astrological Ages (or four mindprint Ages, since Age Taurus is doubled). Celestial poles move in an inward spiral arc around the ecliptic pole, analogous to precession, and the Age of the artist’s or builders’ culture, usually the Age before the work.

Four of the types are optionally doubled or single; types 1 and/or 2 Builder or Taurus, are opposite types 8/9 Healer or Scorpius; and types 5a/5b Priest or Aquarius, are opposite types 12/13 Heart or Leo. Type 5 repeats is number in the first magnitude series (some cultural media express two or three cycles of mindprint, where 5:20 and 5:21 are differentiated by their numbers). Thus the highest type number in the first magnitude is type 15 Maker or Gemini, however there are sixteen types, since label 5 is initially repeated.

Known magnitudes of the sixteen types are 0:15, 1:16, 2:17, 3:18, 4:19, 5:20, 5:21 (where the sequence changes to sequential numbers), 6:22, etc (from where the sequence is validated against atomic numbers in the periodic table, and against features of the I Ching, though not against the variant number sequences of divination sets).

The entire arrangement of five layers of structure, is subconscious and compulsive to artists, and independent of conscious and conventional attributes, design grids, perspective lines, and ‘conceptual’ meanings and conscious symbolism. Conscious ‘logic’ or rationalisation offers various layers of optionality to artists, builders and cultures, but the subconscious archetypal features remain standard in all cultures, areas and ages.

Mindprint was discovered in 2010, and its types, attributes, geometry, polar structure and correspondence with myth, emblems, the Tarot deck and astronomy (particularly hour decans or ‘lunar’ calendars) were assigned, numbered and tabulated by Edmond Furter, and published in the art analysis, anthropology and archaeo-astronomy book Mindprint, the subconscious art code, in August 2014 (Lulu.com).

After Furter, ED, 2014. Mindprint, the subconscious art code. Lulu.com

Terminology and data has since been updated in Stoneprint, and in Stoneprint Journal editions.

 

Update of typology labels, features, and global average occurrence (January 2019)

This table also serves as a standard format for testing and reporting the identification of subconscious, archetypal features in artworks, rock art works, building sites, or other media.

Site /Artwork,,,, expresses ,,,,

This ,,,,, in ,,,,, is noted for ,,,,,.

General themes in the work include types ,,,,

In any artwork, building site, or sequential craft set (calendar, gods, divination list, alphabet, emblems), characters form an axial grid by their eyes or focal points, and express about 60% of these recurrent feature clusters, with each feature at a measurable universal average frequency

Type; Character (archetypal features with average frequencies):

01 /02 Builder; twist 44%, cluster 23%, bovid 19%, bird 19%, tower 18%, build 14%, sack 10%, hero 10%, book 8%, spring 8%, maze 8%, pit 8%,

02c Basket; weave 25%, container 20%, instrument 20%, shoulderhump 20%, hat 15%, weapon 15%, throne 10%, snake 10%, secret 10%, planet 7%;; armlink 50%, leglink 20%,

03 Queen; neckbend 31%, dragon 19%, sacrifice 17%, queen 13%,school 12%, spring 10%, fish 6%, ram 4%, pool,

04 King; squat 30%, rectangle 28%, king  22%, twins 13%, sun 12%, bird 10%, fish 8%, furnace 8%, field 5%,

04p Galactic South Pole; limbjoint 67%; juncture 17% (spout 12%, stream, speech, spit),

05a /05b Priest; varicoloured 37%, priest 34%, hyperactive 33%, tailcoathead 32%, assembly 30%, horizontal 28%, water 24%, heart 24%, large 24%, bovid 20%, reptile 10%, winged 14%, invert 12%, sash 8%, judgement 8%, weapon of opposite 7%, felid of opposite, equid, ascend,

05c Baskethead; weave 16%, tail 14%, U-shape 10%, container 8%, tree/herb 4%, oracle(maze), spirit (ka), spheres, route, horned (of 6), disc,

06 Exile; ingress/egress 58%, horned 44%, sacrifice 30%, small 14%, U-shape 13%, doublehead 12%, caprid 8%, reptile 6%, tree 4%, disarmed,

07 Child; rope 24%, juvenile 24%, bag 22%, unfold 13%, beheaded 10%, chariot 8%, mace 6%, off-grid,

07g Galactic Centre; limbjoint 38% (foot 26%); juncture 34% (throne, altar, line, spiral, tree, staff); path/gate 18%; water 16%,

08 /09 Healer; bent 28%, strong 28%, pillar 28%, heal 22%, disc 14%, smelt 8%, ritual 6%, bag 6%, head 4%, canid 4%, ram 4%, scorpion,

09c BasketLid; disc 27% (hat 15%, lid 12%); instrument? 25%, reveal 16%, hump 15%, planet 10%, weave 8%, enforce 7%, pillar  6%, snake 5%, metal 4%;; armlink 54%, leglink 20%,

10 Teacher; W-shape 44% (arm/s 28%), staff 36%, huntmaster 24%, guard 20%, metal 14%, market 14%, disc 12%, council 11%, snake 8%, ecology 8%, school 6%, carousel 4%, canid 4%, horns 4%, fish 4%,

11 Womb; womb 88%, wheat 15%, water 14%, tomb 11%, interior 8%, library 8%, law 5%, felid 5%.

11p Gal. Pole; limbjoint 64% (hand 12%, foot 12%, elbow 10%); juncture 24% (door 12%),

12/13 Heart; heart 83%, felid 42%, death 34%, round 21%, invert 14%, weapon 11%, war 9%, waterwork 8%, angel 4%,

13c BasketTail; oracle 14%, head 14%, hat/lid 10%, weave 8%, tree 6%, tail 4%,

14 Mixer; ingress/egress 43%, time 28%, tree 20%, angel 15%, bird 11%, antelope 10%, felid 8%, dancer 8%, reptile 4%, fish 4%, canid 4%,

15 Maker; churn 44%, rope 28%, order 27%, rampant 26%, bag 20%, mace 16% (weapon 12%), doubled 16%, canid 12%, face 12%, sceptre 11%, smiting 8%, reptile 8%, winged 8%,

15g Galactic Gate; juncture 30% (river 10%); limbjoint 12% (jaw 8%),

The axial centre or ‘Ecliptic pole’ is unmarked 59%, limb joint 24%, juncture 14%.

Midsummer or ‘Celestial pole’ is a limb joint 54%, juncture 24%.

Midwinter or ‘Celestial South Pole’ is a limb joint 46%, juncture 24%.

Solstice polar orientation is on the horizontal 50% /vertical 12% plane, or north-south meridian or east-west latitude.

Polar markers place ‘summer’ in Leo /Cancer /Gemini, thus ‘spring’ and the cultural time-frame in Age Taurus /Aries /Pisces, confirmed by a prominence.

The general theme of dispersed features is type __

Structural layers of expression are subconscious to artists, architects, builders, crafters, and members of any culture.

An analysis could be scored as __/75 archetypal features; __/16 axial points; _/5 polar markers; _/1 planar or cardinal orientation; _/1 correlation with the Age, or Age prior to the work; _/2 general themes; thus __/100, minus __ extra characters off the axial grid; total __%. The average analysis score is 60%, in a sigma range of about 0.4 (40% range), from 40% to 80% of known features. The scoring formula may change if more features are isolated.

Mindprint book summary

The introduction explains how to read the illustration labels (see a post and comments on www.edmondfurter.wordpress.com), and reveals the types and structural features in art. It also notes some aspects of their disguise.

Chapter A demonstrates six examples of the typological sequence, and explains structural sets in nature, myth, grammar and our subconscious.

Chapter B demonstrates the structure in our iris and bodies, and explains our structural perception, inspiration, consciousness, psychology and disguise.

Chapter C demonstrates the structure in our hands, and explains the co-incidence of structure in our bodies, culture, events and literature.

Chapter D demonstrates cosmic structure and explains structural cosmology, astronomy and astrology.

Chapter E demonstrates cosmic polar structure and explains structural time, Ages, archaeo astronomy, planets and spherical doubling.

Chapter F demonstrates artistic structure in a famous painting by Pierro de Cosimo (see below), and explains structural symbolism, artistic functions, initiation and esoterica.

Chapter G demonstrates a rock art painting process, and explains structural inspiration and compulsive expression.

Chapter H tests mindprint in two Egyptian decanal sets [Narmer and Dendera; see below], and explains conscious aspects of expression, as well as the Tarot trump sequence numbering.

Chapter J lists the attributes and concepts of the sixteen types, reduces these to tables, offers a format for artistic typological data, formulates a statistical test, tests 170 artworks, lists and explains the results. It also demonstrates how to identify visual types and archetypal structure in art, speculates on the possibility of prior discovery, and lists the few inherent ambiguities among some types.

Chapter K compares scientific and esoteric paradigms, illustrates natural ‘art’, and speculates on the implications of the discovery of mindprint for some sciences and crafts.

Chapter L demonstrates mindprint in 200 artworks (the book contains 214 examples in total), grouped by their dominant themes, and ordered to compare rock art against schooled art. Some notable details are explained.

The postscript explains how the visual types and structure were found. (see below)

Mindprint index

  • How to read the illustration labels
  • The typological sequence and axial grid
  • The subconscious artefact and its disguise
  • [A] The figure sequence in our art
  • Comparing our semi-conscious sets
  • Animals, Myth, Grammar, Subconscious layers
  • [B] The structure in our eyes and bodies
  • Our eyes flash Boo; Oto-visual emissions
  • The vortex of visual inspiration
  • Gestalt and Occam
  • Psychological structure
  • [C] The structure in our hands
  • Our inner and outer structures converge
  • Archetype dressed as culture
  • Literate structure in a Mishnah
  • [D] The structure in our cosmos
  • Our astronomical sets
  • The galactic and polar cross
  • Astrological structure
  • 40 [E] The three poles of time
  • 42 Our calendric sets
  • 43 Ages in art
  • 46 Age Aries, Age Pisces, Age Aquarius
  • 50 The typological spiral chart
  • 52 [F] The structure in our art; Honey to mead
  • 54 Conscious and subconscious meaning in art
  • 57 Mystery and initiation
  • 58 Instant culture, art analysis, doubled spheres
  • 62 [G] The layers in our expression
  • 64 Digging through paint layers
  • 67 The double life of decans
  • 68 Decans on the Narmer palette
  • 70 Decans in the Dendera zodiac
  • 72 The Tarot trump sequence
  • 73 Compulsive inspiration and expression
  • 75 [J] Holistic types 1 to 15
  • 79 Typological tables
  • 82 Statistical test of artistic types
  • 84 Statistical test results
  • 87 How to identify types and structure in art
  • 88 Commission impossible
  • 88 Duplications and conventions
  • 89 Conscious recognition is elusive
  • 91 Ambiguous types
  • 93 Scientific and esoteric paradigms
  • 96 Nature is also an artist
  • 97 Esoteric structure
  • 98 Implications for sciences and crafts
  • 99 [L] Mindprint and sixteen themes illustrated
  • [Note; Type labels in the first edition used mythic constellation and hour decanal names, with the warning that typology is also in myth and strology, but does not arise from any media. Type labels have since been updated to generic social function labels; and the four half-types or Basket types have since been defined and demonstrated.]
  • 100  1 Taurus Auriga, Orion; Rain diviner
  • 110  2 Taurus Pleiades, Perseus; Rainmaker
  • 118  3 Aries Andromeda; Moon queen, dragons
  • 130  4 Pisces Pegasus; Sun king, Sun twins
  • 134  5a Aquarius Pegasus; World baptist
  • 148  5b Aquarius; World spirit
  • 160  6 Capricornus; Pan
  • 164  7 Sagittarius; Bag
  • 170  8 Scorpius Ophiuchus; Giant snake holder
  • 180  9 Scorpius; Giant in trance
  • 182  10 Libra Bootes; Lord of the forest
  • 188  11 Virgo; Womb
  • 198  12 Leo Crater; King inverted
  • 212  13 Leo Ursa; King’s heart
  • 224  14 Cancer Ursa Minor; Time angel
  • 232  15 Gemini; Creator and rope churner
  • 240  15 Gemini Canis; Creator wounded
  • 250 How mindprint was discovered
  • 253 Acknowledgements, About the author
  • 254 Terminology
  • 257 Index of rock art tested, Index of art tested
  • 265 Graphics sources, Sources, References.

(Excerpt from Mindprint, the subconscious art code, by Edmond Furter, 2014, Lulu.com)

 

==== Comment from David Allen April 2015;

Thank you for the opportunity to meet you and to listen to your talk. What you said has sent me back to the drawing board concerning my knowledge of archetypes.

What had the most impact for me was your reference to the fact that archetypes, and even culture itself, are not some artificial “construction” born of this reality, but come from a pre-existent reality that “was” before the “big bang”.

The way you supported this contention by showing how virtually one single visual pattern is repeated (with some minor variations) through all works of inspired art (I think your use of the distinction “inspired” was essential here) stretching from as far back as the Ice Age into the modern era, across many nations, cultures, religions, belief systems, continents, and throughout history, and how it can be traced in the heavens, served to emphasise this point particularly strongly for me.

Although the idea of a “pre-existent reality” is not new to me, I have found almost no support for it. If anything I have come across only deep and virulent criticism of it and so have kept an open mind on the subject. Maybe it is a sign that I need to hang out with a better class of reading material.

I found your support of this notion very pleasing because it confirmed something that always made intuitive sense to me. It will give me much food for thought and reflection in the coming weeks and months because it will feed into, and influence to some extent, much else that I am interested in.

But probably the most important revelation was that your talk has shown me how much I still have to learn and how much work awaits me in terms of now having to unpack and discard much of what I have taken to be “true”, and then to refresh my conceptual foundation and belief system concerning a number of important topics.

I begin the task of reading and absorbing your book today. -David Allen.

Categories
How to identify mindprint types and structure in art

How mindprint, the subconscious art code, was discovered

Themes, moods, rhythms, styles and fads in poetry and lyrics could each be reduced to a distinctive format among a limited range of modes or ‘grooves’, and compared across a gulf of millennia to identify the character of the inspiration.

So it seemed to a literature student raised on Homer and art rock. My first thesis, Urban poets and prophets, directly compared some poems and ‘art rock’ lyrics. “Once tuned in to a particular inspiration, a poem writes itself”, I announced to a literature lecturer, who in return rattled off a list of authors, such as Mallarme, who have already said that.

“We should study poem cycles for their mythic structures, and study writing techniques only for how they support thematic structure,” I announced to a poetry lecturer, who suggested that I should study philosophy or psychology instead.

My next thesis explored the structure of phonemes (speech sounds) and the limits of meaning as revealed by their artistic use in what I took to be lyrical ‘modes’, bent to similar structural rules as parts of speech. Each phoneme’s pronunciation and perception is influenced by the succession it occurs within.

We perceive the distribution and succession as a whole, a kind of auditory speed-reading that support some meanings and obscure others. The grammar lecturer replied that I should consider an anthropology or psychology course.

From a combination of Freudian psychology and myth, including Fraser’s apparently fragmented Golden Bough, emerged vague but persistent impressions that some elements of the human psyche and culture were structured, compulsive and somewhat mechanistic, but partly subconscious and expressing spiritual logic beyond conscious definition. Jung’s depth psychology I had to read in my own time, it was not part of the psychology course.

An eventual career in journalism taught me that living myth and legend, or myth in the making, dictates which news, history and even technical magazine content would sell. No story is as difficult to write and to read as one containing new thought patterns or new assumptions. News gradually revealed itself as the sceptic’s definition of history; a set of fictions we agree to tell one another.

Invisible structure dogged my writing, and my hobby as a musician. Underneath conscious behaviour and even small talk, lie elements of a bigger conversation that I sought out in Egyptology, archaeology, astronomy, sacred sites, Theosophy and art.

Archaeology Society field trips and aerial photography flips over extensive kraal (cattle corral) cities in South Africa offered me a visual framework for interpreting cultural artefacts as shaped by individual and collective economy (paths of least resistance), using ready physical material and symbolic spacing. Culture seemed also to ‘write itself’.

The idea that visual art express stock themes, just as poems, lyrics, phonemes, huts and music do, gradually rose to prominence as I studied supposed astronomical artefacts, to find archetypes instead.

Rock art images often include swallow mud nest forms, swifts in half-human shape, water and a vortex in the sky. These birds, sometimes half-fish and mistaken as ‘mermaids’, are what archaeologists label ‘swift people’ (see theme 1 Taurus16), but archaeological literature fails to address the rest of the ensemble, or visual ‘mode’, resembling predictions of the 9/11 2001 New York terror attack.

An alchemical emblem by Basil Valentine of the 1300s (type 1:16 Builder/Sacker or Taurus) contain the same features that I had linked to swift people in rock art, and in Tarot trump 16 (Tower struck by lightning), several years before the iconic event of November 2001. Valentine’s alchemical emblem shows a high-rise city, on an island across a bridge, on fire, with a tract above it being torn up or struck by lightning. The medieval caption speaks of national pride, meddling in foreign affairs and mixed messages coming home to roost, in the same terms and tone used by critics of former USA president George W Bush.

Illustrations to the modern tale of the Wizard of Oz, with the related theme of a towering city and a yellow brick road, and the synonymous song by Bernie Tauplin and Elton John, closely fit the type or mode. Lyrics to Yellow brick road (“When are you gonna come down, when are you going to land… I bet that’ll shoot down your plane”) below an image of the fallen World Trade centre, came as a shock of recognition to the informal class of archaeo astronomers that I teach each midwinter holiday in June-July.

I gradually came to understand that the subject of my short course in archaeo astronomy was a misnomer, since it revealed structures in supposed astronomical artefacts that do not require archaeology or astronomy to express or to read.

Type t16 in an image dictated by Hildegard of Bingen, and woven by ecstatic nums. Compare Tarot trump 16, and swift people in art, and citadels struck by lightning or discord in alchemical emblems. The type is explained in detail in the book Mindprint, the archetypal art code (Edmond Furter, 2014, Lulu.com)
Type 1 Builder/Sacker or Taurus in an image dictated by Hildegard of Bingen, and woven by ecstatic nums. Compare to Tarot trump 16, and swift people in art, and citadels struck by lightning or discord in alchemical emblems. The type is explained in detail in the book Mindprint, the archetypal art code (Edmond Furter, 2014, Lulu.com)

If the Tower of Babel had a type number (1:16), and a cluster of features (build, sack, rain, etc), and came with a standard set of supporting icons and themes, such as language, diplomacy and trade tracts; then other icons in art, rock art, poetry, supposed prophecy and even historic events, could carry similar heraldic and emblematic markers. If archetypal events tend to be well recorded and reported, and less archetypal events selectively recorded, then visual art could reveal a visual grammar, and in turn crack the archetypal code.

While following this approach in research, I chanced on an image of the Lamb of God (Agnus Dei) in a Papal seal imprint in ash-laden wax, posed as a query in an archaeological magazine (Voyage of the Planet, now defunct). I recognised the image from a Babylonian cylinder seal and the Egyptian Narmer palette that I had already tentatively identified with myths and features related to dragons and to Aries.

Since Agnus Dei was universally known in Judaeo-Christian iconography as well as astrology, it offered an anchor point for the underlying structure of myth. The Lamb of God also appears in alchemical emblems and Tarot trump 18 (Moon), anchoring a camouflaged sequence of correspondences, affinities, or ‘tacking’ between several esoteric sets.

Conventional logic that tags the Tarot’s crayfish to Cancer had to be wrong. The creature had to be Cetus or its tail, expressing the concept of a Kraken-type sea monster, the scaly component of a dragon, by definition a composite beast. Conventional astrology that cast Aries as a ram and ram only, had to be wrong.

Yet another clue to the sequence of types emerged from my own archaeo astronomy course material; a music DVD including an interview with rock icon Ian Anderson, genius of the band Jethro Tull, explaining how he eventually discovered that his chromatic, lilting, riffed music, and one-legged stance, resembled Krishna and Kokopelli (Jethro Tull, Living with the past, Eagle Vision DVD). Anderson does not mention Pan, but I already had his number from mythology, since forests, goats, and Capricornus ‘tacked’ to Trump 6 (Lovers) in the Tarot deck.

Combining these and other anchor points and filling in the gaps, I cracked the sequence of attributes that populate myth, alchemy, art, astrology and Tarot trumps. The little list (actually a semi-spiral with four expandable parts) soon became a lens with which to read rock art, which emerged as identical to myth and schooled art in inspiration, compulsion and structure, across the gulf of millennia and continents.

t16 tarot tower

Art history and archaeology are prone to exaggerating diffusion and conventions, despite examples of independent development of similar pantheons, rituals, pyramids, temples, monuments and the entire repertoire of culture in the Americas and elsewhere. All have characters near identical to Perseus, Hercules and the rest, and modes similar to ode, sonnet, gloria, blues and hero epic.

The concept of cultural elements, such as half-humans, as idiosyncratic developments, prompted and ‘framed’ by their own cultures, had to be wrong.

Comparing ancient Egyptian rock art and Egyptian formal (dynastic) art with Zimbabwean rock art, allowed a series of breakthroughs beyond the broadest thesis or imagination of my earlier research in lyrics, speech sounds and emblems. Many figures include standard attributes in implicit elements such as a staff, a long or craned neck, certain postures, relatively larger or smaller size, pregnancy, position relative to the approximate centre, species, attire, skin paint, status or apparent social function.

The frequent distinctive attributes appear in the periphery, in a standard sequence, and as axial opposites, which in turn reveal the standard geometric structure.

The more I tested, the simpler the sequence and structure became to identify. If academia was right, archetypes should be scattered at random in art, and every region or culture should have a unique set of figures, and display different stages of development in different eras. Yet artists all sing the same hymn to an archetypal tune, over the same set of polar ‘chords’.

If art history was right, there should be no axial structure in art. Iconographic analysis of large political art panels at Wits University (see T’Kama Adamastor), Brenthurst Library (see Leonard French’s Bridge), and the Voortrekker Monument (see Hennie Potgieter’s marble friezes), confirmed the same ‘rock art sequence’ in schooled art. Only some stylistic elements differ.

Learned artists, and supposedly primitive rock artists whose visionary figurative and geometric engravings I had puzzled over on field trips, share subconscious recourse to archetypal structure. The universal structure also appears in myth and wisdom literature. A deceptively simple little list of seasonal evening stars in the Mishnah confirmed astrology as just another layer or medium, and not the origin of structure (see the Literature section).

From years of searching for a ‘unified field theory’ in esoteric literature, I knew that lists appeared in hundreds of guises, but were nowhere reduced to a universal set, except in the stereotype of astrology, and these do not explain the more ‘rounded’ halo’s of meanings that I found in emblems and art.

Could there be more than conceptual symmetry between the sixteen types that were emerging? When I had casually asked sculptor Danie de Jager about geometric ratios in art, he explained that artists had “geometry built in”.

To find these ‘built-in’ structures on a larger scale, I developed a template from what I had thought at first to be a re-construction of a ‘Babylonian’ division of the cosmos and constellations, keyed to galactic features, mythic figures of various relative sizes and extent, as well as star lore.

Once I understood this structure as archetypal, not an ‘oral tradition’, legacy or secret source, but re-invented by every culture, and innately understood by artists and viewers, healers and patients, it became obvious that the sequence and the structure were part and parcel of perception.

Most artists do not study astronomy, and would have to invest some months of conscious effort to become familiar with the interplay between the forces, positions, observation and background texture of the sky. Yet the innate structure of perception, as revealed in artistic expression, could be super-imposed on a cosmogram or star map, or on any sufficiently complex natural or cultural set.

I systematically super-imposed astrological, alchemical, emblematic, mythic and conceptual elements on the sequence revealed by my affinitive ‘tacking’, then on a multi-cultural armillary projection of the sky developed for an educational installation in a theme park (not yet built). I tested the sequence and its structure on rock art, then on famous artworks, then on amateur art.

The structure hinges on the eyes of each figure (or in frontal faces on the eyes nearest to the geometric focal point), and on axes to the eyes of each opposite but complementary types (with two constant exceptions; a heart and a womb, corresponding to type 13 Heart or Leo, and type 11 Womb or Virgo). These axes always cross in one point.

One of the first rock art works to confirm the test in all its complexity was a group of goat people (half human figures) in Turkey, in a small shelter at Mount Latmos near Ephesus. Perhaps it was an informal oracle site, or just the haunt of an inspired goatherd that may have been a candidate for a temporary appointment at one of the earlier ‘Amazonian’ oracles, or the later formal temples. Perhaps by an aristocrat ordained for religious service as a Vestal virgin or priest, or a poet such as Aesop.

As I compared the ‘primitive’ figures to sophisticated, ritualised, formulaic, programmatic art depicting Artemis and her goats, it became clear that the elaborate oracular rock art of the Matobo range in Zimbabwe was no different in impulse, core content, structure, impact or style.

Panel after panel of rock art reproductions (particularly in the book by Elspeth Parry), as well as a range of works by classical and modern masters, chosen for their apparent differences, cracked under the lens of what I eventually named mindprint.

Another strand in the braid of archetypal expression came from the order of painting. Archaeologists carefully label strata, often paper thin, as they dig down, leaving portions they name ‘witness sections’ stuck with an array of flagged pins to re-check their dig reports and subsequent seasons or other sites against. This method, named the Harris matrix, they also apply to rock painting, useful where many figures partially overlay one another (assuming that each figure is completed in a separate episode).

The method reveals likely episodes of painting, typically grouping three, four, five or six figures into three, four or five episodes. Comparison of a meticulous academic paper on stratigraphy in a Drakensberg rock art work, to mindprint analysis of the same work, revealed that the artist had painted pairs of opposite figures together. This may not apply to all artists (see stratigraphy problems in the ‘Three Magi’ rock art scene in examples Chapter 13), but the cloth of evidence was woven to demonstrate the collective subconscious inspiration, or at least expression in practice.

The evidence awaited only a statistical test, which added the final strand to the art code. Despite my habitual reluctance for quantitative grammar, the test and results ‘wrote themselves’, and revealed some visual and structural qualities that the new conceptual sequential and geometrical lenses did not initially detect.

This study traces the structure in visual expression back to the invisible structure of inspiration and perception, and thus to the structure of nature, as far as we could know her, ultimately to archetype, which existed before creation and time. Breaking through the layers of disguise and distraction that protect our conscious logic from subconscious logic, required following thousands of trails in a forest of scientific and esoteric mazes, locking out dead ends, and returning to unexplored turns.

The reputed skill of artists in translating inspiration into visual form, as a tool of individual spiritual transformation, is confirmed. Our conscious and scientific views of art, perception and ultimately identity, have to recognise that we are essentially re-creators of archetypal structure.

Since the sequence and structure of visual types are sufficiently demonstrated, as repeated and repeatable, it stands as an artefact requiring a theory, no longer a theory supported by artefacts. Relevant sciences, arts and crafts will probably find their own explanations for mindprint.

The book was written twice, first as 200 captions to art and rock art images, to demonstrate how artists express eternal archetypes in a mixture of consciously understood and subconscious, universal esoteric terms, then as a statistical research report.

[UPDATE 2019 January; Since Mindprint, the same structural features were demonstrated in building sites, in the book Stoneprint (2014). The list of isolated features, and their average features, was expanded there, and in six editions of Stoneprint Journal in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019.]

Together, the images and text place mindprint, our involuntary art code, in context with archaeology, anthropology, mythology, philosophy, psychology, art history and popular culture.

The two spheres of this book, theoretical and practical, hopefully enable conscious access to the vast array of subconscious meanings in art, in acclaimed individual works and seemingly different cultures across continents and millennia.

The revelations and conclusions enable a synthesis of our academic, artistic and esoteric views of culture. The three sides of the artistic, esoteric and scientific divide meet here on their own terms.

Mindprint leads several crafts, arts and sciences through their commonalities to the subtext in cultural and natural expressions of archetype.

To avoid the double risk of alienating scientists by esoteric terminology, or alienating esoteric readers by scientific terminology, technicalities are kept to a minimum. Concepts are demonstrated in terms of actual expressions of the archetypal attributes and structure in artworks, and multiplied by many references to the 200 illustrated examples.

Science and esoterica both operate on the principle of predictability and isolation (distinction), although science proceeds from measurables in theoretical context, and esoterica from intrinsic correspondences. This book describes and tests archetype in both contexts.

– Edmond Furter, Johannesburg, March 2014

(Extract from the Postscript in the book Mindprint, the subconscious art code, 2014, Lulu.com, 266 pages, 200 illustrations, $29 plus postage, or R250 at presentations in South Africa, or email edmondfurter at gmail.com)