London’s Roman, Medieval and Civil War gates formed stoneprints

London’s last permanent wall probably expressed the same subconscious structuralist orientation as the stoneprint among London buildings. During the Renaissance London’s buildings doubled in diameter, and quadrupled in surface. The wall was demolished and gates became obsolete. London’s stoneprint retained its orientation (as Rome, Paris and other cities did), but some buildings and some gates acquired new identities, and the polar points moved south-westward, first to Temple Ave, then to the south bank corner.