Archetypes in Dilmun trade seals, Egyptian cylinder seals and cotton spindles

Some trade seal stamps from Bahrain, of Dilmun culture; some rare pre-dynastic Egyptian cylinder seals; and some late Egyptian cotton spindle ‘buttons’, are among the 50 seals and stamps used to demonstrate that miniature artworks and ancient logos subconsciously express the universal five layers of culture, identical to larger artworks, but with a few structuralist compromises (for often having fewer than the minimum twelve eyes). Here is an extract from Stoneprint Journal 5 (where 30 of the 50 ancient miniature artefacts are demonstrated, and statistics of the average frequencies of typological features are expanded).

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London’s Roman, Medieval and Civil War gates formed stoneprints

London’s last permanent wall probably expressed the same subconscious structuralist orientation as the stoneprint among London buildings. During the Renaissance London’s buildings doubled in diameter, and quadrupled in surface. The wall was demolished and gates became obsolete. London’s stoneprint retained its orientation (as Rome, Paris and other cities did), but some buildings and some gates acquired new identities, and the polar points moved south-westward, first to Temple Ave, then to the Thames south bank corner.